Common Factors That Increase Your Blood Alcohol Content

These Are Some Of The Most Common Areas That Can Increase Your Chances of Getting a DUI

In 2016, statistics revealed that over 27 people died in car crashes caused by drunk driving in Arizona [editing note:  I’m assuming that these people died in 2016 Arizona drunk driving accidents].  Not all drivers intentionally drink and drive; some think that the small amount of alcohol they consumed did not impair their ability to drive.  You might want to wait for your body to metabolize that alcohol before driving after reading about the factors known for increasing the alcohol content in your blood below.

 

AMOUNT OF FOOD CONSUMED

If you’ve consumed protein-rich food before drinking, the chances of being intoxicated may be less.  Alcohol is more likely to be processed faster if the person who drinks it doesn’t have any food in his stomach.

The amount of food consumed is a factor because the digestion process plays a huge role in the body’s absorption of alcohol.  For almost everyone, the liver can only digest one drink an hour.  The more drinks you have, the bigger the workload for your liver.  Drinking only one drink per hour helps keep your blood alcohol content (BAC) in the safe level.

 

ALCOHOL CONCENTRATION

Blood-Alcohol-Content—Stronger-Drinks-Higher-Risk

The stronger the drink, the higher your BAC will be.  Higher alcohol content in drinks will irritate the mucous membranes lining the gastrointestinal tract.  This means one thing: slower alcohol absorption rate and higher chances of intoxication.

 

GENDER

Studies have found that women have less dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible for breaking down alcohol in the digestive system.  The less dehydrogenase you have, the more likely it is for your BAC to shoot up when you drink.  This is why women become intoxicated faster even if they’re drinking the same amount of alcohol as men.

Women also tend to get higher BACs around the time of menstruation.  Their hormone levels definitely affect their alcohol absorption levels.

 

BODY TYPE AND WEIGHT

If you have a small body mass, you tend to become intoxicated easily when drinking alcohol.  Even if two people weigh the same, the person with more fat in his or her body is likely to have lower BAC when they drink the same amount of alcohol.

 

CONSUMPTION RATE

Have you ever wondered why you shouldn’t gulp down your drink in one go?  This is because the sudden rush of alcohol will raise your BAC much faster than when you drink the same amount slowly.

 

INDIVIDUAL ALCOHOL TOLERANCE

Some people can drink lots of alcohol but not get intoxicated, while others get drunk after only two glasses of the same alcohol.  A person’s functional tolerance determines how resistant his body is to the effects of alcohol, partly because of his liver’s strong capacity to continuously filter out the alcohol in the body.  You’re not home free even if your individual alcohol tolerance is high; your blood will still contain traces of alcohol.

 

MEDICATIONS

Alcohol is a drug that might interact with other medications in your system.    Be wary of drinking alcohol while on certain medications because some drugs have harmful side effects when taken with alcohol (e.g. antidepressants).  Certain painkillers, on the other hand, can raise the effects of alcohol up to ten times.

If you take prescription or over-the-counter medication, it’s very important to discuss this with your doctor so he or she can advise you on how much alcohol you can safely consume.

 

Just in case you’re pulled over for unintentionally driving under the influence (DUI) you should know that there are DUI attorneys that are experienced in these cases.  A proficient DUI attorney will help you come up with a legal defense that will help you in your case. Check out Gary Rohlwing’s practice areas and learn more on how I can help you!

 

Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing
7112 N 55th Ave
Glendale, AZ 85301
(623) 937-1692
http://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/
http://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/blog/

 

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