Author Archives: Gary Rohlwing

Arizona Enacts Provisional Licensing for Former Felons

A Fact Sheet published by the National Employment Law Project on August 1, 2016, conservatively estimated that roughly 70 million people in the United States have some sort of criminal record. Having a criminal record can make it difficult to obtain an occupational license required by the State of Arizona. On May 1, 2017, Governor Ducey signed a bill adding A.R.S. § 41-1093 which gave state licensing boards the authority to issue either a regular license or a provisional license to an otherwise qualified applicant who has been convicted of an offense. A provisional license is valid for one year and the ability of the applicant to subsequently obtain another such license in the future is within the discretion of the licensing authority. The law does not preclude a licensing authority from exercising its existing discretion to issue a license to individuals who are not covered under this law. If an applicant is employed in a licensed assisted living or skilled nursing facility, the provisional license must include a condition that the provisional licensee may only work under the direct supervision of another licensee who is not a provisional licensee, and the supervising licensee must sign a verifying affidavit. If a provisional licensee was convicted of an offense that involves a violation of Title 13, Chapter 15 (criminal trespass or burglary) or 19 (theft) within the last ten years and if the occupation is one in which a licensee regularly enters private residences, the provisional license must include a condition that the provisional licensee only work under the direct supervision of another licensee who has no criminal record during all home visits and the supervising licensee must sign a verifying affidavit. If the offense occurred more than ten years ago, the condition is discretionary with the licensing authority. The regular license may include this condition if the licensing authority determines that the condition is warranted. The licensing authority may conduct reasonable enforcement activities to ensure this supervision condition is complied with over the course of the license term. The licensing authority may revoke a provisional license if the provisional licensee is charged with a new felony; commits an act or omission that causes the provisional licensee’s community supervision, probation or parole to be revoked; or violates the law or rules governing the practice of the occupation for which the provisional license is issued. The new law does not apply to the following applicants: Convicted of a crime that results in the death or physical injury or any criminal use of a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument according to A.R.S. § 13-901.03; Convicted of public sexual indecency to a minor according to A.R.S. § 13-1403(B); Convicted of sexual abuse, sexual conduct with a minor, sexual assault, sexual assault of a spouse, molestation of a child, continuous sexual abuse of a child, sexual misconduct by a behavioural health professional, commercial sexual exploitation of a minor, or sexual exploitation of a minor according to A.R.S. § 13-1420; Convicted of kidnapping according to A.R.S. … Continue reading

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Collateral Consequences of Domestic Violence Convictions

According to the American Friends Service Committee-Arizona, “Collateral consequences” are legal punishments and other restrictions imposed on people because of their criminal convictions that are in addition to any term of incarceration, fines, fees or supervision imposed by the courts as punishment for the crimes. As Gabriel Chin wrote in “The New Civil Death: Rethinking Punishment in the Era of Mass Conviction”: “As a practical matter, every criminal sentence contains the following unwritten term: The law regards you as having a “shattered character.” Therefore, in addition to any incarceration or fine, you are subject to legal restrictions and limitations on your civil rights, conduct, employment, residence, and relationships. For the rest of your life, the United States and any State or locality where you travel or reside may impose, at any time, additional restrictions and limitations they deem warranted. Their power to do so is limited only by their reasonable discretion. They may also require you to pay the expense of these restrictions and limitations.” Even a misdemeanor conviction for domestic violence can have the following collateral consequences: Federal prohibited possessor of a firearm; Loss of employment and career opportunities; loss of child custody; loss of immigration status; future felony prosecution; and Potential civil liability to victim’s landlord if victim breaks lease according to A.R.S. § 33-1318(A). The collateral consequences of domestic violence convictions in Arizona are wide ranging and serious. Defense attorney Gary Rohlwing has decades of experience in helping clients mitigate the collateral consequences of their domestic violence convictions. Call or e-mail him today. Cities We Provide Domestic Violence Case Assistance: Glendale Case Assistance Peoria DV Cases Avondale Cases Goodyear DV Defense Surprise Services   Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing 7112 N 55th Ave Glendale, AZ 85301 (623) 937-1692 http://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/  

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Collateral Consequences of Criminal Convictions

In December 2016, the American Friends Service Committee-Arizona published a report entitled A New Public Safety Framework for Arizona: Charting a Path Forward that discussed collateral consequences of criminal convictions. “Collateral consequences” are legal punishments and other restrictions imposed on people because of their criminal convictions. They are in addition to any term of incarceration, fines, fees or supervision imposed by the courts as punishment for the crimes. As Gabriel Chin wrote in “The New Civil Death: Rethinking Punishment in the Era of Mass Conviction”: “As a practical matter, every criminal sentence contains the following unwritten term: The law regards you as having a “shattered character.” Therefore, in addition to any incarceration or fine, you are subject to legal restrictions and limitations on your civil rights, conduct, employment, residence, and relationships. For the rest of your life, the United States and any State or locality where you travel or reside may impose, at any time, additional restrictions and limitations they deem warranted. Their power to do so is limited only by their reasonable discretion. They may also require you to pay the expense of these restrictions and limitations.” The American Friends Committee report noted: “The American Bar Association has identified 886 collateral consequences in the state of Arizona. These include possible exclusion from or denial of professional licenses in such fields as pest management, morticians/embalmer, athletic trainer, insurance, motor vehicle dealer, real estate, security guard, cosmetology, interpreter, firefighter, hazardous waste disposal, and a variety of healthcare-related fields. . . . The end result is that our policies and practices essentially guarantee recidivism. Collateral consequences prevent individuals with criminal convictions from doing what we as a society claim we want them to do—rehabilitate themselves, get jobs, and become stable, contributing members of society. Collateral consequences set people up to fail. For example, a person just released from prison on supervision will likely be required to find housing and a job within a certain period of time. He will also be expected to pay a fee for his supervision, drug testing, and other required activities (drug treatment, anger management, etc.). But because of the felony conviction on his record, he cannot find work. He is unable to pay his fees on time, and is charged a late fee, which he is also unable to pay. After a certain amount of time without finding work or paying his fees, he may be revoked back to prison for violating the terms of his release. For those without supervision, the struggle to obtain employment and safe, stable housing is just as difficult. Lacking reliable transportation, affordable childcare, and other supports many of us take for granted, the stress can lead to relapse into substance abuse, and a slide back into criminal behavior.” The collateral consequences of criminal convictions in Arizona are wide ranging and serious. Defense attorney Gary Rohlwing has decades of experience in helping clients mitigate the collateral consequences of their criminal convictions. Call or e-mail him today. Check out all my practice areas … Continue reading

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Driving Restrictions Due to a DUI Conviction

Generally, you need to have a fingerprint clearance card issued by the Arizona Board of Fingerprinting if you work with children, the elderly, disabled adults, and victims of domestic violence. Dentists, dental hygienists, denturists, nurses and real estate agents also need fingerprint clearance cards. A.R.S. § 41-1758.03(D) states: “D. A person who is awaiting trial on or who has been convicted of comm05itting or attempting to commit a misdemeanor or felony violation of section 28-1381, 28-1382 or 28-1383 in this state or the same or similar offense in another state or jurisdiction within five years from the date of applying for a fingerprint clearance card is precluded from driving any vehicle to transport employees or clients of the employing agency as part of the person’s employment. The division shall place a notation on the fingerprint clearance card that indicates this driving restriction. This subsection does not preclude a person from driving a vehicle alone as part of the person’s employment. This subsection does not apply to a person who is licensed pursuant to title 32, chapter 20, except if the person is employed by an agency as defined in section 41-1758.” A.R.S. § 41-1758(1) defines an “agency” as: “1. “Agency” means the supreme court, the department of economic security, the department of child safety, the department of education, the department of health services, the department of juvenile corrections, the department of emergency and military affairs, the department of transportation, the state real estate department, the department of financial institutions, the board of fingerprinting, the Arizona game and fish department, the board of examiners of nursing care institution administrators and assisted living facility managers, the state board of dental examiners or the Arizona state board of pharmacy.” The three laws mentioned in A.R.S. § 41-1758.03(D) are driving under the influence, driving under the extreme influence, and aggravated driving under the influence. A person who is licensed “pursuant to title 32, chapter 20” is a licensed real estate agent. A licensed real estate agent is highly unlikely to be employed by any of the agencies listed in A.R.S. § 41-1758. Therefore, A.R.S. § 41-1758.03(D) allows licensed real estate agents to transport clients and employees even though they have DUI convictions. At first glance, it doesn’t seem like the driving restriction would apply to many people since not everyone works for an agency.Unfortunately, private employers may interpret A.R.S. § 41-1758.03(D) as precluding them from hiring or continuing to employ a person with the driving restriction. Another obstacle may be the private employer’s car insurance which may not cover an employee who has a driving restriction. A DUI conviction will subject you to the driving restriction under A.R.S. § 41-1758.03(D). This collateral consequence means that you should hire an experienced DUI attorney if you are charged with a DUI. Attorney Gary Rohlwing has over three decades of experience defending against DUI charges. Call him today for a free consultation. Cities We Provide DUI Legal Defense: Glendale Affordable Peoria Services Buckeye Defense Goodyear Services Affordable … Continue reading

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Arizona Amends Civil Asset Forfeiture Laws to Help Innocent Claimants

In October 2016, the Institute for Justice filed a lawsuit in Navajo County Superior Court on behalf of an elderly couple, Terry and Ria Platt. The police pulled over their son, who was driving their car, for a window tint violation. They seized the son’s cash and a small amount of marijuana. Even though Arizona law does not permit forfeiture of a car under these facts, prosecutors are ignoring the law and trying to forfeit the car. The Platts’ story is just one of many where innocent people are ensnared by the Arizona Civil Asset Forfeiture Laws. In April 2017, Governor Ducey signed a bill amending the Arizona Civil Asset Forfeiture Laws. These laws allow the State to seize real and personal property from people who haven’t been charged with committing a crime. A civil asset forfeiture proceeding may be in rem or in personam. A judicial in rem proceeding involves a judgment against the property at issue while a judicial in personam proceeding involves a judgment against a person who is asserting ownership of the property at issue. In both types of proceedings, the State must now prove that the property is subject to forfeiture (in rem) or the person’s interest in the property (in personam) is subject to forfeiture by clear and convincing evidence. “Clear and convincing evidence” is a higher burden of proof than the previous standard “preponderance of evidence.” The Arizona Supreme Court has defined “clear and convincing evidence” as evidence that the truth of the contention is highly probable in State v. Roque, 213 Ariz. 193 ¶ 75 (2006). Other important amendments help claimants. According to A.R.S. § 13-4314(F), a court may now award reasonable attorney fees, expenses and damages for loss of the use of the property to any claimant who substantially prevails at the hearing.  Moreover, a court must award treble costs or damages to any claimant where the court finds that reasonable cause did not exist for the seizure or the filing of the notice of pending forfeiture, complaint, information, or indictment and that the seizing agency or attorney for the state intended to cause injury or was grossly negligent. Whether or not your charges involve civil asset forfeiture, you need an experienced defense attorney to represent you. Attorney Gary Rohlwing has over three decades of experience. Call him today for a free consultation.  

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